Neighborhoods and Communities
Hollywood
Formerly a religious colony, then an independent city, Hollywood was annexed by Los Angeles in 1910. Its name is synonymous with the motion picture industry, yet much of movie production has moved out to the neighboring LA communities in the San Fernando Valley region. Tourists flock to Hollywood Boulevard to gaze up to the Hollywood sign in the Santa Monica Mountains. The last decade has brought new life to the once-struggling parts of the Hollywood district with various developments taking advantage of new subway stations. The wealth of the neighborhoods here is strongly influenced by elevation; some of the wealthiest tracts in the country are up in the Hollywood Hills with gradually less affluent population leading to pockets of large working-class and transient populations further southeast. Median housing prices currently are around $515,300.

Harbor Area
Following the Harbor Gateway south to the port leads to the Harbor area, an enclave of Los Angeles surrounded by various cities and towns. The land of the Harbor Gateway was annexed to the city of Los Angeles so it would have a contiguous land connection with its seaport. The most prominent neighborhood of the harbor area is called San Pedro. Homes in this area averaged around $393,100 as of December.

Los Feliz and Silver Lake
Nestled between Hollywood and the Los Angeles River are a group of the city’s older residential neighborhoods that houses Griffith Park, one of the nation’s largest public parks. Similar to most of the city, communities in this area are significantly wealthier closer to the hills. In this fashion, Los Feliz retained its expensive reputation while other districts further south and closer to Westlake were plagued by gang wars or crime. In the last decade, the area particularly around the Silver Lake Reservoir and now Sunset Boulevard has become associated closely with gentrification, a process which has pushed working-class families out due to high housing costs. Most of this area (61.8 percent) is single-family homes, and the median list price in this area was $1,150,000 at the end of last year.

South Los Angeles
South Los Angeles, formerly called “South Central Los Angeles,” includes most of the city directly south of downtown, Interstate Highway 10 (the Santa Monica Freeway) and Wilshire Boulevard, but not those areas as far southeast as the Harbor Gateway, the Harbor Area or the Port of Los Angeles. This area of Los Angeles is where most of its African-American population resides. Houses in this area go for a median list price of $230,000.

San Fernando Valley

The largest region of the city is the San Fernando Valley, often referred to as “the Valley.” It includes portions of the Crescenta Valley and is mainly suburban with a wide range of socioeconomic groups. It comprises almost half of the city’s land area and about 40 percent of the city’s population. This area is sometimes referred to known as “North Los Angeles” because the main suburbs of LA at Mulholland Drive in the Santa Monica Mountains forms its southern boundary. It has gone through periodic clashes with the rest of the city over policy, culminating in a failed effort to incorporate as a city in 2002. Median home prices as of the end of last year was $399,000.

West Los Angeles (The Westside)
West Los Angeles is the part of the city encircled by Beverly Hills, West Hollywood and Wilshire on the east and Santa Monica and the Pacific Ocean on the west, the Santa Monica Mountains on the north and Culver City and El Segundo on the south. While the area is inhabited by a wide range of socioeconomic groups, it undoubtedly houses the largest concentration of wealth in the city. Attracted by its rolling hills on the north end and close proximity to the ocean, early developers succeeded in establishing some of the most upscale residential districts in the city and the county. Pre-eminent among these are Bel Air and Pacific Palisades. Yet further south, pockets of working-class areas remain in those areas closest to former industrial areas like those near South LA and Culver City. The term Westside, though often debated, refers to both the western parts of the city of Los Angeles as well as adjacent cities and towns, such as Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, and West Hollywood. With this diversity, median housing prices are around $370,000.

   
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